Posts Tagged ‘Marked’

WANTED! Marked Tundra Swan Reports – Wintering Birds from Alaska

November 26, 2010
Marked Tundra Swan Blue Collar AK project

Reports Wanted! Marked (blue-collared) Tundra Swans Disperse from Alaska

REPORT MARKED TUNDRA SWANS
November is migration time for Tundra Swans which pour forth from the north. All observers are asked to be vigilant for sightings of marked TUNDRA SWANS WITH BLUE NECK BANDS FROM ALASKA.  An impressive effort has gone into marking 1873 individuals in the last three years. Your observations will be key to success of this effort!
TUNDRA SWANS WERE MARKED IN WESTERN AND NORTHERN ALASKA IN THE SUMMERS OF 2006-2010 WITH CODED NECK BANDS AS PART OF AN EFFORT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE TIMING OF MIGRATION AND MOVEMENTS OF SWANS RELATIVE TO BREEDING AREA.
NECK BANDS HAVE A FOUR-DIGIT CODE THAT BEGINS WITH A LETTER. CODES ARE READ FROM BOTTOM TO TOP. BANDS ARE BLUE WITH WHITE DIGITS, EXCEPT CODES T3##, WHICH ARE WHITE WITH BLACK DIGITS.
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Marking Location,  Codes, #/year:2006 – 2008,  2009 , 2010,  Total #
Yukon Delta:  K###    (227)     (100)    (0 )     Total = 327
Alaska Peninsula (North) :    N###     (— )  (— )   (52)    Total = 52
Alaska Peninsula (North):  P###   (148)   (105)  (51)   Total = 304
Alaska Peninsula (South):  T###    (155)   (— )  (101 )   ( 256)

Koyukuk Drainage*:  T213-228, U075-U120, U390-U399  (66)  (—)  (–)  Total = 66
North Slope:   T172-212, 296-299 T3##   (84 )  (—)  (— )  Total=  84
Kotzebue Sound:   U###   (390)  (197) (197 )  Total = 784
Totals:  (2006-2008 = 1070    (2009 = 402)   (2010 = 401)   Total to date: 1873
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* Collars with codes U075 – U120 have the letter separated from the numbers (oriented
vertically)

In 2008, 50 swans were implanted with satellite transmitters, many of which are still functioning. Birds with transmitters were not collared, but have a black antenna exiting near the base of the tail. The movements of these swans can be followed at our web site: http://alaska.usgs.gov/science/biology/avian_influenza/TUSW/index.html

PLEASE REPORT ANY OBSERVATIONS TO the USGS Bird Banding Lab ) to the Trumpeter Watch program of TTSS trumpeterwatch@trumpeterswansociety.org or direct to biologist
Craig Ely
Alaska Science Center
4210 University Drive Anchorage, AK 99508
Phone: (907) 786-7182
EM: cely@usgs.gov

This Alaska office, as well as the Bird Banding Lab WILL PROVIDE ALL OBSERVERS WITH A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BANDED SWAN THEY OBSERVED. Those reported to TTSS will be forwarded to the BBL and to Craig. Thank you!

 

TRUMPETER WATCH UPDATE – TRUMPETERS ARE ALL OVER THE MAP!

February 27, 2010

We’re very pleased we decided to pioneer Trumpeter Watch in this particular year. Despite lean times for nonprofits and no firm budget set aside for the project, we felt a sense of urgency. In this we were right on the mark.

Chuck Otte, Listserv (KSBIRDS-L) owner and upcoming author on bird distribution in Kansas describes what he calls an “inundation of Trumpeter sightings” since the first of the year. He notes six first county records for Kansas over the last two winters; two have occurred in the last few weeks. From Missouri, David Rogles reports record numbers (counts of over 500) of Trumpeters overwintering near West Alton at Riverlands. Another Missouri observer reported a collared bird (Red 8M5) for which Dave Hoffman (Iowa Department of Natural Resources) gave its history: this bird was born in 2007, spent the next 2 years in Iowa in two different counties, and then appeared near Vernon, Missouri, in 2010, with an unmarked partner.

Mary Bote has kept close tabs on Oklahoma where Trumpeters are showing up across the state, now reported from 11 separate geographic areas. Karen Rowe (Arkansas Fish and Game Commission) notes a lot of action in Arkansas, which she will be reporting to us in a summary at winter’s end. In Indiana, Ryan Sanderson reported a family of five swans in Clay County, four of them had collars traceable to Wisconsin. While the Memphis Zoo is proud to add captive Trumpeters to its new Yellowstone exhibit, birders are excited that wild Trumpeters appeared in recent weeks along the Tennessee-Arkansas border.

We’ve had reports of note from throughout the Trumpeter Watch area. A red-collared bird (6H5) reported by Joy Colbert of Cadiz in Trigg County, Kentucky, originated in Iowa. Some of you may remember the excitement caused by Trumpeters being tallied on a Virginia Christmas Bird Count last year. This year, three collared individuals were found in Virginia likely coming from two sources – Iowa and Wisconsin.

Out west, SeEtta Moss reported two adult Trumpeters near Canon City, Colorado in December. South of that, Narca Moore-Craig, artist and Business Member of TTSS, had us contact Cathie Sandall at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in Socorro, New Mexico, who has since kept close tabs on a surviving juvenile, one of two observed there this winter.

What we are learning is that swans are pioneering into new areas and will need to be included in waterfowl management plans for these areas. As we receive and analyze more data, we expect more exciting discoveries.

Photo: Trumpeter Swans on Ice by Gretchen Steele