WANTED! Marked Tundra Swan Reports – Wintering Birds from Alaska

Marked Tundra Swan Blue Collar AK project

Reports Wanted! Marked (blue-collared) Tundra Swans Disperse from Alaska

REPORT MARKED TUNDRA SWANS
November is migration time for Tundra Swans which pour forth from the north. All observers are asked to be vigilant for sightings of marked TUNDRA SWANS WITH BLUE NECK BANDS FROM ALASKA.  An impressive effort has gone into marking 1873 individuals in the last three years. Your observations will be key to success of this effort!
TUNDRA SWANS WERE MARKED IN WESTERN AND NORTHERN ALASKA IN THE SUMMERS OF 2006-2010 WITH CODED NECK BANDS AS PART OF AN EFFORT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE TIMING OF MIGRATION AND MOVEMENTS OF SWANS RELATIVE TO BREEDING AREA.
NECK BANDS HAVE A FOUR-DIGIT CODE THAT BEGINS WITH A LETTER. CODES ARE READ FROM BOTTOM TO TOP. BANDS ARE BLUE WITH WHITE DIGITS, EXCEPT CODES T3##, WHICH ARE WHITE WITH BLACK DIGITS.
______________________________________________________
Marking Location,  Codes, #/year:2006 – 2008,  2009 , 2010,  Total #
Yukon Delta:  K###    (227)     (100)    (0 )     Total = 327
Alaska Peninsula (North) :    N###     (— )  (— )   (52)    Total = 52
Alaska Peninsula (North):  P###   (148)   (105)  (51)   Total = 304
Alaska Peninsula (South):  T###    (155)   (— )  (101 )   ( 256)

Koyukuk Drainage*:  T213-228, U075-U120, U390-U399  (66)  (—)  (–)  Total = 66
North Slope:   T172-212, 296-299 T3##   (84 )  (—)  (— )  Total=  84
Kotzebue Sound:   U###   (390)  (197) (197 )  Total = 784
Totals:  (2006-2008 = 1070    (2009 = 402)   (2010 = 401)   Total to date: 1873
_______________________________________________________
* Collars with codes U075 – U120 have the letter separated from the numbers (oriented
vertically)

In 2008, 50 swans were implanted with satellite transmitters, many of which are still functioning. Birds with transmitters were not collared, but have a black antenna exiting near the base of the tail. The movements of these swans can be followed at our web site: http://alaska.usgs.gov/science/biology/avian_influenza/TUSW/index.html

 PLEASE REPORT ANY OBSERVATIONS TO the USGS Bird Banding Lab ) to the Trumpeter Watch program of TTSS trumpeterwatch@trumpeterswansociety.org or direct to biologist
Craig Ely
Alaska Science Center
4210 University Drive Anchorage, AK 99508
Phone: (907) 786-7182
EM: cely@usgs.gov

This Alaska office, as well as the Bird Banding Lab WILL PROVIDE ALL OBSERVERS WITH A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BANDED SWAN THEY OBSERVED. Those reported to TTSS will be forwarded to the BBL and to Craig. Thank you!

Photo: Martha Jordan

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22 Responses to “WANTED! Marked Tundra Swan Reports – Wintering Birds from Alaska”

  1. Jean Raines Says:

    In late March of 2010 we were pleasantly surprised to see a flock of 7 Swans on our the dam adjacent to our buildings. They came and over the next month, varying in number from 4 to 24 birds. In the 56 years we have lived here we have only once had a group of 4 birds that stayed overnight. The location of our home is SW quarter of Sec.2., Twp. 27, R.2., W. of 5th. I’m sorry that I do not know the GPS coordinates but it is about 5 mi. NW of the city of Calgary or l mi. NW of the junction of Sec. Highways 772 and 567. During the month that the birds were here, I’m sure that many more than 24 were present for shorter stays. The previous year (2009) the late summer was very warm and the water level dropped and a heavy growth of pondweed and grass took over much of the water surface. As a result, most of the smaller sloughs and
    dugouts dried out, and this dam provided both water and food. One of the birds had a blue and white neck collar, P905, and I have been trying ever since to get some information about it. When I watched a TV documentary recently re Trumpeter Swans nesting at Elk Island Park I emailed the Park. Brett Sarchuck responded and sent me information on your project. I have a picture that a friend took of the marked bird that I will send in a separate email.
    Best wishes to you on your project.
    Jean Raines

    • trumpeterswansociety Says:

      This is a marked Tundra Swan from Alaska, (blue color and four letter code) and I’m sure they will be thrilled to get the report. I’ve forwarded it on to the biologist listed in our Blog Post, Craig Ely at the Alaska Science Center. P codes are from the ALaska Peninsula North according to information we received. Thank you, please let us know how long this bird stays in your area. Peg Abbott, TTSS Outreach Coordinator

  2. -jon Says:

    Tundra Swan Neck Band T533
    image on flickr
    2011-02-16 Tundra Swan T533 (1024x680)

  3. -jon Says:

    Tundra Swan Neck Band P985
    image on flickr
    2011-02-18 Tundra Swan  P985 (1024x680)

  4. Ron Fritz Says:

    P977 has died of unknown cause at cougar bay on lake coeur dalene Idaho on 3/11/2011. Let me know if you need additional information.

  5. -jon Says:

    A few more sightings all have been reported to:
    Craig R. Ely
    cely@usgs.gov
    Alaska Science Center
    4210 University Drive
    Anchorage, AK 99508

    Tundra Swan Neck Band T672
    image on flickr:
    2011-03-10 Tundra Swan  T672 (1024x680)

    Tundra Swan Neck Band P732
    image on flickr:
    2011-03-10 Tundra Swan  P732 (1024x680)

    Tundra Swan Neck Band T643 & T644
    image on flickr:
    2011-03-18 Tundra Swans T643 & T644 (1024x680)

    Trumpeter Swan Neck Band M28
    image on flickr:
    Trumpeter Swan  M28 (1024x680)

  6. Nachhaltig Leben Says:

    Nachhaltiger Tourismus…

    WANTED! Marked Tundra Swan Reports – Wintering Birds from Alaska « Trumpeter Swan Society Blog…

  7. Larry Cowan Says:

    I had a yellow neck band M37. It doesn’t appear to be form your study group. I had better look closer at the swans in my area. They area predominately Trumperters. Do you know of any bandinf with “yellow” bands and only an alpha followed by two digits.

    Larry Cowan
    Pitt Meadows, BC
    Canada

  8. jon michael Says:

    Details provided by Craig R. Ely cely@usgs.gov

    Tundra Swan Neck Band P893 was banded on 25 July 2009 as an adult female, near King Salmon, on the Alaska Peninsula
    21011-12-02 Tundra Swan P893 (03) (1024x680)

    Tundra Swan Neck Bands N038 & N039
    N038 was bandead as an adult male on 21 July 2010 near King Salmon, on the northern Alaska Peninsula.
    N039 was bandead as an adult female on 21 July 2010 near King Salmon, on the northern Alaska Peninsula.
    2012-03-23 Tundra Swan N038 & N039 (01)  (1024x680)

    Tundra Swan Neck Band N003 was banded on 20 July 2010 as an adult male, near King Salmon, on the Alaska Peninsula
    2012-03-08 Tundra Swan N003 (02)  (1024x680)

    Tundra Swan Neck Band P911 was banded as an adult bird, unknown sex, on 27 July 2009 near King Salmon on the Alaska Peninsula
    2012-03-18 Tundra Swan  P911 (1024x680)

    Tundra Swan Neck Band T639 was banded as an adult male on 27 July 2010 on Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, near Cold Bay, on the Alaska Peninsula
    2012-03-17 Tundra Swan (03)  T639 (1024x680)

    Tundra Swan Neck Band T662 was banded as an adult female on 28 July 2010 on Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, near Cold Bay, on the Alaska Peninsula
    2012-03-17 Tundra Swan (02)  T662 (1024x680)

    Tundra Swan Neck Band N045 was banded as an adult female on 22 July 2010 on near King Salmon, on the Alaska Peninsula
    2012-03-17 Tundra Swan (01) N045 (1024x680)

    Tundra Swan Neck Bands P733, P978, P949, P732
    P732 was banded as an adult male on 22 July 2006 near King Salmon on the northern Alaska Peninsula
    P733 was banded as an adult female on 22 July 2006 near King Salmon on the northern Alaska Peninsula
    P949 was banded as an adult female on 18 July 2010 near King Salmon on the northern Alaska Peninsula
    P978 was banded as an adult male on 19 July 2010 near King Salmon on the northern Alaska Peninsula
    2012-03-15 Tundra Swans & Trumpeter Swans (06) (1024x680)

    Banded Tundra & Trumpeter Swans flickr set:

    2011-02-18 Tundra Swan  P985 (1024x680)

    jon

  9. Brandon Says:

    h59 was found on sheffield rd cambridge ON does anyone know where it was born ?

    • Kyna Says:

      Hi Brandon: Thank you for reporting your sighting of a Trumpeter Swan. We don’t know where H59 was born, but she was banded at LaSalle Park in Burlington as a second year bird on Jan 27, 2010. Since then all the sightings we have had for her were in the Glen Morris area. Could you provide an address or GPS for the sighting? We like to be as presice as possible when recording birds. Also what date was H59 seen and is she still there?

      Kyna, Ontario Trumpeter Swan Restoration

  10. Sophie Cheney Says:

    Oct. 28, 2012. H59 arrived yesterday on the Campbellville Pond in Campbellville, Ontario. C14 has been here all summer.

    I understand that trumpeters reintroduced to Eastern Canada do not exhibit migratory behavior which must be learned. Could you tell me whether either of these birds has migrated. Many Canada geese overwinter in our pond which remains open in one spot all winter. Should we help the birds overwinter here?

    • trumpeterswansociety Says:

      Hi Sophie: H59 seems to stay in the local area. C14 has had a short migration from Erin to St. Catherines and back, but we don’t know where he spent last winter. Because the birds are wild, we would not advise feeding them to keep them at a spot in the winter. They should choose where they want to go based on available natural food.
      Kyna, Ontario Trumpeter Swan Restoration

  11. Sophie Cheney Says:

    On Oct. 29, H59 was hit on Hwy 401. My husband passed a lump of white feathers on the shoulder of the highway and thought the bird was dead. He was not able to stop since he had a transport truck behind him. When he went back, the bird wasn’t there. The location was the west-bound lane of Hwy 401 just east of the Guelph Line. I am not sure if someone else stopped to rescue the bird or it was dragged off by a predator. Sorry to give you bad news.

    • trumpeterswansociety Says:

      Oh no. This is very sad news. Thanks for letting us know. If we could find out who picked the bird up, we should have it taken to Guelph for necropsy.
      Kyna, Ontario Trumpeter Swan Restoration

  12. Sophie Cheney Says:

    I have been back over the area on foot. The bird must have been picked up by a motorist. Keep your fingers crossed.

    • trumpeterswansociety Says:

      Hi: I’ve been on the phone with everyone from the area Animal Services, OPP, MTO on down to the contractor and crew that take care of that section of road and nobody has record of this bird being picked up by a legitimate group. I also spoke to the CCWHC at Guelph and they did not have anyone drop the bird off to them. So maybe a passerby picked it up and took it home, which is not permitted, but we are at a dead end. If anyone picked up this bird, banded and tagged H59 we would appreciate getting the bird to Guelph for a necropsy. I can be contacted privately at kynadawn@hotmail.com
      Kyna, Ontario Trumpeter Swan Restoration

  13. Sophie Cheney Says:

    The identity of the bird hit on Hwy 401 near Campbellville was C14 not H59 as originally reported. H59 was spotted several days after the accident. It appears that C14 was hit while flying between the Campbellville pond and a smaller pond north of Hwy 401. H59 was last seen in Campbellville on Nov. 2.

    C14 was here all summer so much to our delight. We will miss his majestic presence.

  14. Kyna Says:

    Hi Sophie: Thanks for clarifying which bird it was.
    Kyna, Ontario Trumpeter Swan Restoration

  15. Mark Goddard Says:

    Okanagan Lake, Kelowna BC Tundra swan Number P944 Blue Band. Bird is with a few other swans and seems healthy and happy. Feb 16th, 2014.

  16. grant Says:

    M31, M34, I68 and one other unidentified swan are on our family pond in Aurora Ontario

  17. Judy Gallardo Says:

    Tundra swan Number P979 sighted Dec. 18, 2014 in Pleasant Grove, Ca.

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