THE TRUMPETER SWAN SOCIETY PHOTO-OF-THE-MONTH – DECEMBER 2009

SNOWY SWANJESS_LEE WEBres SNOWY SWAN by Jess Lee

FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE MONTH – JESS LEE, IDAHO

This month’s photo is a special one, just an amazing image from an extensive collection of Trumpeter Swan shots by professional Jess Lee of JessLeePhotos. Based on the Idaho side of the Yellowstone Ecosystem, Jess travels around the world. Trumpeter Swans are a favorite subject.

Professional Photographer and TTSS Photo-of the-Month host Greg Smith says:
Jess Lee’s photo of a Trumpeter Swan with the ridge of ice and snow behind it evokes a truly wild feeling. It is cold and remote, yet there is the swan flight moving easily through the air. The back lighting is outstanding as seen through the feathers. A photographer’s challenges to create a stunning photograph in this all white setting are daunting. Jess was able to balance the snow and the dorsal side of the bird in the sun with the shadowed snow and the underside of the swan. Quite an accomplishment, but then there are the black facial features to contend with. Jess captured those features too with equally balanced lighting! Finally, look at the depth of field with the face and the primaries on the back wing, not unexpected given the lighting. When you combine the subject matter, setting, depth of field with the lighting you get an outstanding artistic photograph of a superb subject

In support of The Trumpeter Swan Society’s 5-year Greater Yellowstone Trumpeter Swan Initiative, Jess Lee has generously donated this image as a LIMITED EDITION PRINT to TTSS. There will be 300 signed and numbered copies for us to offer to members and fans. All the income from sales, except a small amount for production and shipping, will go to support TTSS’ 5-year Greater Yellowstone Trumpeter Swan Initiative.

Today’s breeding population in Yellowstone is in serious decline. Peg Abbott, TTSS Blog host asked Jess Lee about this; here is a portion of his passionate reply:

“Like I said, I think that as conservationist and wildlife advocates we have done a decent job of protecting and restoring large mammals such as Grizzlies and Wolves. While doing this we have allowed other grand creatures such as the Yellowstone Trumpeter swans to slip toward extinction from their traditional core range. As a photographer who has observed and wondered at the grace and beauty of these charismatic birds for over three decades, I find the increasing emptiness of Trumpeter Swans from their traditional breeding grounds in Island Park, Centennial Valley and Yellowstone as a real loss.

I find it very interesting to read, that during the early days of WW2 when our nation was at great peril, a critical military installation near Henry’s Lake was halted for the fear it would disrupt the swan habitat in Island Park and Red Rocks. Today, when we feel that we have an enlightened view of wildlife conservation, Island Park abounds with summer homes and the management plans at Red Rock Lakes had to be revised to include security for Trumpeter Swans. We need to act to see that their population decline is halted.”

YOU CAN ACT! Order a LIMITED EDITION of Jess Lee’s amazing image, and know that you’ve done something significant to help Trumpeter Swans. This print will make a great holiday gift as well. It is a wonderful way to give a beautiful gift, while putting your dollars to work to benefit the swans.

Order your Limited Edition 12 x 18 print today! The cost is $235, which includes shipping and handling. Shop online with secure credit card payment, email us at ttss@threeriversparkdistrict.org or FAX your order in to 763-557-4943 today!

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One Response to “THE TRUMPETER SWAN SOCIETY PHOTO-OF-THE-MONTH – DECEMBER 2009”

  1. Leroya Hodge Says:

    Sunday December 20th, 2009 approx 4pm
    driving from Alton IL to St Charles County MO US highway 67,
    we had just crossed the Lewis & Clark Bridge over the
    Mississippi River we saw at least 4 separate groups of
    trumpeter swans each group had from 6 to 15 birds flying south/east.
    geese and ducks are so common in our area – we have
    never seen trumpeters before. they were beautiful.
    i believe they were flying to the ellis lake area of the river.

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