Archive for the ‘TTSS About the Society’ Category

The Trumpeter Swan Society Welcomes New Board Members

May 15, 2013

HAL EVERETT swans in flight

The Trumpeter Swan Society is pleased to announce three new Directors have joined the Board to lead the Society in its dynamic endeavors to assure the vitality and security of wild Trumpeter Swans. Carey Smith of Vancouver, Washington, Jeff Nelson of Bozeman, Montana, and Sara Street, from Victoria Harbour, Ontario, have joined the Board of Directors.   We are very pleased to have these talented people on The Trumpeter Swan Society team!

Carey Smith

Retired Coordinator of the Pacific Coast joint Venture

Carey, a native of Illinois, served as a pilot in the US Air Force following his graduation from the University of Montana with a degree in zoology.  After his military tour, he returned to the University of Montana and completed a Masters Degree in Wildlife Biology. From 1978 to 1983, he was the Pacific Flyway Biologist for the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).  These unique positions combine the skills of waterfowl biologist and airplane pilot for completing aerial surveys throughout North America as well as numerous other migratory bird program functions.

In 1983, Carey began a 5-year assignment as the Regional Refuge Biologist for FWS in Portland, Oregon.  In that job, he initiated annual biological workshops for field staff of National Wildlife Refuges in that region and was responsible for evaluation and oversight of refuge biological programs in over 100 refuges in 7 western states.  As the regional biological program developed, it became the Division of Biological Support for which Carey was the Chief from 1988 through 1990.

In 1990, Carey became the Coordinator of the Pacific Coast Joint Venture (PCJV) of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan.  He coordinated wetland and migratory bird conservation projects from Alaska through coastal British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon.  He was responsible for fundraising and facilitation of numerous important initiatives.  In 2004, Carey retired from FWS, but continued as Coordinator of the PCJV under contract until his retirement in 2012. 

Jeffrey Nelson

Deputy Director for WWF’s Northern Great Plains Program

Jeff joined the World Wildlife Fund in January 2012 as the Deputy Director for the its Northern Great Plains Program.  Prior to joining WWF, Jeff was with Ducks Unlimited, Inc. for 30 years. He spent 12 of those years in Bismarck, North Dakota, where he expanded the Great Plains program from 20 people to 65, tripled fundraising revenues, and assembled and led a strong, innovative conservation team.  Prior to that, he served in various executive positions at the National Headquarters of DU, including Group Manager and Chief Biologist for the organization.  He and his staff were recipients of several awards, both internally and from partners.

In February 2008, Jeff was appointed CEO of Ducks Unlimited Canada where he led a staff of 420 until his retirement in the fall of 2011.  During that period, Jeff restructured the executive team and led the development of long-term strategic and annual business planning.  A comprehensive capital campaign by DUC was completed under his tenure, generating nearly $600M as part of a continental campaign together with Ducks Unlimited, Inc. that raised $1.7B in 6 years. While there, he served on the Boards of Ducks Unlimited Canada and Wildlife Habitat Canada.

A scientist by training, Jeff received an MS in Wildlife Ecology from Utah State University and did his field work at the Delta Waterfowl and Wetlands Research Station in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba.  He brought his fundraising experience, strategic planning skills, and continental network to WWF where he is now leading efforts toward on-the-ground con­servation in the Northern Great Plains. Jeff leads the program’s conservation and planning efforts while supporting its managing director.  He is focused on growing relation­ships with conservation groups, public agencies, and tribes, while forming new partnerships with rural communities, landowners, and sportsman organizations.

Sara Street

Executive Director, Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre 

Sara is currently the Executive Director of the Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre, located on 3,000 acres of wetlands, fen, and forest in Midland, Ontario (near Georgian Bay). She leads the organization in its mission to spark a commitment to conserving wetlands, woodlands, and wildlife by creating exciting learning opportunities in a natural setting. Wye Marsh has played an integral role in Trumpeter Swan restoration since biologist Harry Lumsden began a provincial reintroduction program in the early 1980s to reestablish the Trumpeter Swan in its former habitat and range. Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre became a cooperator in the restoration of this magnificent species in 1989. Sara began work with Wye Marsh Wildlife Centre as a volunteer in 2008, and then became an employee in 2009, delivering educational awareness programs to participants of all ages as a professional outdoor educator.  She took on stewardship responsibilities for the organization in 2011. From this work, Sara brings organizational, educational, outreach, stewardship, and networking skills to TTSS.

Sara knows Trumpeter Swans on a first-hand basis, having worked with the team of Bev and Ray Kingdon, Kyna Intini, and Julie Kee to capture and mark Trumpeter Swans in Ontario. She is a licensed bander and participates in the collection of Trumpeter Swan carcasses for necropsy in order to determine cause of death and monitor the health of the population and capture and treat any injured swans as necessary.  Sara works to promote public awareness about the species throughout Ontario. She also brings an awareness of research and applied research to the Board, having worked previously on Golden-winged Warbler research and conservation and on reptiles at risk around Canada’s Georgian Bay.

Sara is steeped in a passion for wildlife, having been born and raised in Brechin, Ontario, on a farm with chickens and beef cattle.  She holds a BS in Zoology from the University of Guelph in Ontario.  Then, from Sir Sandford Fleming College in Lindsay, Ontario, she received a diploma in Ecosystem Management Technology, which focused on a number of things, including Benthic Biodiversity Network training, hands-on training in corporate sustainability, urban design and planning, and wildlife management.

Photo: Hal Everett, Washington

The Trumpeter Swan Society Announces Fifth International Swan Symposium: Call for Papers – Deadline 21st July 2013

May 12, 2013
Trumpeter Swan by John VanOrman

Trumpeter Swan by John VanOrman

The Trumpeter Swan Society announces the 5th International Swan Symposium of the IUCN-SSC/Wetlands International Swan Specialist Group, being held in conjunction with the 23rd Conference of the Trumpeter Swan Society: Easton, Maryland 3 – 6 February 2014. Following the first announcement of the meeting, the Scientific Committee is calling for additional abstracts from those interested in presenting talks and/or posters.  .

Abstracts both for oral and for poster presentations should be of up to 500 words (max) and should be submitted to Eileen Rees, Scientific Coordinator for the symposium, by email (Eileen.Rees@wwt.org.uk). The abstract should include the names of co-authors, their email addresses, the postal address of the correspondence author, and details of student status (if applicable). For oral presentations, it is assumed that the correspondence author would be giving the talk, but this can be finalized in the weeks prior to the meeting.

Presentations can be on any aspect of swan research, and sessions will be grouped in accordance with the abstracts received, but we particularly encourage contributions on the following topics:

  • Migration strategies
  • Adaptation to changing environmental conditions
  • Threats faced by swan populations
  • Long-term population trends and distribution
  • Policy and management of swan populations

The deadline for submission of abstracts is 21st July 2013.

They will then be assessed by the Scientific Committee of the symposium, for approval for presentation at the meeting.

Authors will be informed whether their presentations have been accepted by 15th September 2013.  The duration of talks and guidelines for preparation of posters will be provided at that time.

If you have any queries regarding the Call for Papers, please contact Eileen Rees. Plans are being developed to publish a symposium proceedings; further information will be provided in due course.

Meanwhile, we look forward to receiving the Abstracts in the coming months.

Eileen Rees, John Cornely, Bart Nolet, Chris Perrins, Ma Ming and Scott Petrie

The Scientific Committee for the 5th ISS

The Trumpeter Swan Society Urges Action: 200 Groups Object to Lead-poisoning Provision in Sportsmen’s Bill

December 3, 2012

http://www.trumpeterswansociety.org/images/swan-information.jpg

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/294/632/199/stop-lead-poisoning-legislation/

Every signature counts, please pass this on!

In late November, 2012, The Trumpeter Swan Society (TTSS) joined more than 200 citizen groups in objecting to a provision in the Sportsmen’s Act of 2012 (Senate Bill 3525) that would create an exemption under federal toxics law to prevent the Environmental Protection Agency from evaluating or regulating lead poisoning of wildlife and humans from hunting or fishing activities.

A wide array of public-interest organizations called on Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) to allow debate on the lead-poisoning exemption. Such debate has never occurred in Congress despite the serious environmental and public-health problems caused by spent lead ammunition and lost lead fishing weights and the availability of nontoxic alternatives to lead. The organizations support an amendment by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) to block the exemption and study the human-health and environmental effects of lead poisoning from lead in ammunition and fishing sinkers.

“It’s outrageous that the Senate can’t find 10 minutes to allow any debate before voting to prevent our federal environmental agency from regulating, or even evaluating, a deadly toxic substance that we know is killing bald eagles and other wildlife — a toxin that causes neurological damage to humans and hinders mental development in children,” said William Snape, senior counsel with the Center for Biological Diversity. “There are good reasons we got toxic lead out of gasoline and home paints. The irony of this bill, preventing any regulation of lead used in hunting ammunition or fishing weights, is that it will harm hunters and anglers.”

The Sportsmen’s Act, which could be voted on as early as today, would create an exemption under the Toxic Substances Control Act to block the EPA from ever regulating toxic lead used in hunting ammunition and fishing sinkers or even evaluating the impacts of lead from these sources. The bill also contains an exemption that would allow imports of threatened polar bear parts from Canada despite the Endangered Species Act’s prohibition against such trade.

“Why would the Senate bow to the National Rifle Association’s anti-science views on lead poisoning and pass a special-interest legal exemption to promote further lead poisoning?” said Snape. “The amendment offered by Senator Boxer would actually establish a moratorium on any regulation of lead in ammunition or fishing sinkers until federal health and environment agencies prepare an objective study that all Americans could trust.”

Toxic lead entering the food chain from spent hunting ammunition and lost or discarded fishing sinkers poisons and kills bald eagles, endangered condors, loons, swans and more than 130 other species of wildlife. Hunters risk lead poisoning from ingesting lead fragments and residues in game shot with lead ammunition. Recent studies and scientific reports show elevated blood lead levels in hunters eating lead-infected meat, as well as dangerous lead contamination of venison donations to low-income food banks.

The Boxer amendment is reprinted below in its entirety.

Boxer Amendment to the Sportsmen’s Act:

SA 2902. Mrs. BOXER submitted an amendment intended to be proposed to amendment SA 2875 proposed by Mr. REID (for Mr. TESTER) to the bill S. 3525, to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fishing, and shooting, and for other purposes; which was ordered to lie on the table; as follows:

Strike section 121 and insert the following:

SEC. 121. NO REGULATION OF AMMUNITION OR FISHING TACKLE PENDING STUDY OF HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS.

(a) No Regulation of Ammunition or Fishing Tackle.–The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency shall not issue any proposed or final rule or guidance to regulate any chemical substance or mixture in ammunition or fishing tackle under the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2601 et seq.) during the period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act and ending on the date of the publication of the study required by subsection (b).

(b) Study of Potential Human Health and Environmental Effects.—

(1) IN GENERAL.–Not later than December 31, 2014, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Secretary of the Interior shall jointly prepare and publish a study that describes the potential threats to human health (including to pregnant women, children, and other vulnerable populations) and to the environment from the use of—

(A) lead and toxic substances in ammunition and fishing tackle; and

(B) commercially available and less toxic alternatives to lead and toxic substances in ammunition and fishing tackle.

(2) USE.–The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency shall use, as appropriate, the findings of the report required by paragraph (1) when considering any potential future decision related to a chemical substance or mixture when the substance or mixture is used in ammunition or fishing tackle.

This text is from a public press release issued by the Center for Biological Diversity, a group coordinating the effort on this vital issue. The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 450,000 members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places. For quick and immediate action, you can sign a petition online at

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/294/632/199/stop-lead-poisoning-legislation/

Every signature counts, please pass this on!

 

The Trumpeter Swan Society and Trumpeters Say Goodbye to a Great Friend, Joe Johnson

November 2, 2012

Joe Johnson at TTSS’s 22nd Conference, Polson, MT

On October 9, 2012, the Society lost Director and friend Joe Johnson. W. C. “Joe” Johnson wrote and implemented the restoration plan for Trumpeter Swans for Michigan and served as the State’s Trumpeter Swan restoration coordinator. He led the very successful effort to restore the magnificent Trumpeter to part of its historical nesting range after over a century.The native of Kalamazoo was best known for his waterfowl and wetland expertise, but his interests and experience were much broader. Joe was an avid hunter and served on the National Board of Directors of Pheasants Forever for 16 years. He was elected to the Board of Directors of The Trumpeter Swan Society in 2003 and was an active member and TTSS Conference participant for many years prior to that. Since 1987, he has been the Chair of the Mississippi Flyway Council’s Swan Committee, continuing to serve even in retirement. At the time of his swan song, he was leading the Flyway Council’s effort to revise the management plan for Trumpeters.

Joe worked at Michigan State University’s W. K. Kellogg Bird Sanctuary for 48 years. He retired in 2007 after being the sanctuary’s Manager since 1985. In addition to his excellent work with swans, he was instrumental in the successful return of Giant Canada Geese to Michigan.

Joe spent his last days at Rose Arbor Hospice Center that is surrounded by a natural space with ponds frequented by flocks of Canada geese. As Joe’s family left Rose Arbor all of the geese took flight hours earlier than their normal routine to escort Joe to the his next Sanctuary. We will sorely miss his friendship and good counsel. We will have to search for someone else to keep us in line according to Robert’s Rules of Order. He was truly one of kind!

When he retired the Kellogg Bird Sanctuary established the Joe Johnson Endowment Fund for Wildlife Conservation Fellowship. This fund provides support for students who want to study and work with wildlife conservation and habitat preservation or restoration at the Sanctuary. The Directors and staff of TTSS are going to make a contribution to the fund to honor Joe for his outstanding contributions to swan conservation and his leadership in TTSS. We invite you to do the same.

You may contribute to the Joe Johnson Endowment Fund for Wildlife Conservation Fellowship online.

The Trumpeter Swan Society Stands Firm on Lead – Call for New Members to Stengthen the Stand

September 12, 2012

Trumpeter in Flight by Gail Miller
http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/trumpeter_swans

TTSS STANDS FIRM ON NEED TO ADDRESS TOXIC LEAD IN AMMUNITION

As TTSS kicks off its Fall Membership Drive, the Board of Directors stands firm on the Society’s fight against toxic lead.  On 7 June, TTSS along with six other conservation groups filed suit against the Environmental Protection Agency for refusing to address toxic lead in hunting ammunition, which frequently poisons and kills eagles, swans, loons, endangered California Condors, and other wildlife, as well as affecting human health. Ignoring well-established science on the dangers of lead poisoning from spent ammunition, the EPA refuses to acknowledge or evaluate risks to wildlife and humans. The EPA in April denied a petition requesting a public process to consider regulations for nontoxic hunting ammunition. TTSS was one of 100 groups that signed that petition.  The lawsuit challenges that decision.

“The EPA has the ability to immediately end the unintended killing of eagles, swans, loons, condors, and other wildlife,” said Jeff Miller with the Center for Biological Diversity. “Unfortunately, the agency refuses to address this needless poisoning. We’ve removed toxic lead from gasoline, paint, and most products exposing humans to lead poisoning; now it’s time to do the same for hunting ammunition to protect America’s wildlife.”

For several years, the Directors of TTSS have urged decision makers to “get the lead out.”  In Washington State and adjacent British Columbia, since 1999, over 3,000 swans have been confirmed to have died from ingesting lead shot.  Expended lead shot persists in the environment for a long time.  These swans died from ingesting lead shot deposited by hunters years ago.

The National Shooting Sports Foundation has branded this a frivolous law suit and an attack on hunting.  As a hunter, TTSS’s Executive Director, John Cornely, takes very strong exception to that, and stresses that getting the lead out is in line with traditional conservation and hunting values.  Indeed, TTSS was founded by waterfowl biologists and hunters and has avid hunters and anglers on its board, staff, and as members today.

There are alternatives to lead rifle bullets and shotgun pellets. More than a dozen manufacturers market varieties and calibers of nonlead bullets and shot made of steel, copper, and alloys of other metals, with satisfactory to superior ballistics. Hunters in areas with restrictions on lead ammunition have very successfully transitioned to hunting with nontoxic bullets.  As the next generation of cygnets fledges, the message from TTSS’s John Cornely is clear, “let’s make the environment safer for them and all of us.”

Associate Director Becky Abel stresses that membership is key to strengthening our voice for Trumpeter Swans and the habitats upon which they depend. To do this, TTSS needs more members, more funds, and more people who understand and support the issues that we tackle. One of our generous board members has offered a membership challenge and will match dollar for dollar all new and increasing donations to TTSS. This is the ideal time to join. Do you know of a classroom that is reading E.B. White’s The Trumpet of the Swan? Why not give the teacher a membership? Are you looking for a meaningful gift idea for a conservationist on your list? Your donations will be matched – JOIN US online today!

The Trumpeter Swan Society’s Associate Director, Becky Abel, Receives TogetherGreen Fellowship

August 26, 2012

TTSS’s Associate Director, Becky Abel

TTSS Board and staff are pleased to report that Associate Director Becky Abel was recently awarded a prestigious TogetherGreen fellowship.

TogetherGreen, a conservation initiative of the National Audubon Society and Toyota, selects 40 high-potential leaders annually to receive a $10,000 Fellows Grant. With the funds, Fellows conduct projects to engage diverse audiences in habitat, water, or energy conservation. In addition to receiving support launching their conservation initiatives, the Fellows also benefit from specialized training and the opportunity to become part of an exciting alumni network of conservation professionals.

“These are heroes. They help people engage with nature. They look like America: diverse, passionate, and patriotic,” said Audubon President David Yarnold. “Becky is a leader, and we’re pleased to give her a chance to invent the future.” Abel’s TogetherGreen project aims to develop guidance documents that outline steps for partnering with electric energy companies across the US to reduce Trumpeter Swan mortality associated with power lines. The TogetherGreen Fellowship Program provides the selected leaders with resources, visibility, and a growing peer network to help them lead communities nationwide to a healthier environmental future.

“Trumpeter Swans offer potential to serve as ambassadors for broad conservation messages related to wetland loss, for responsible stewardship of the earth’s biodiversity, and to highlight threats to migratory birds,” Abel explained. “Unfortunately, human-caused hazards and habitat alteration continue to threaten the species’ long-term security.”

“We want to build partnerships between unlikely allies—conservation groups and electric energy companies,” she added. “In addition to Trumpeter Swans, our work will benefit Tundra Swans, Whooping and Sandhill Cranes, pelicans, and other large, low-flying birds.”

Learn more about Becky’s project on the TogetherGreen website, which describes their mission this way:  “The TogetherGreen Conservation Leadership Program invests in high-potential leaders, providing them with tools, resources, visibility, and a peer network to help them lead the conservation actions necessary to shape a greener, healthier future.”  The Trumpeter Swan Society applauds Becky for her role in this important project.

The Trumpeter Swan Society Members Share Creative Work Inspired by Swans

August 9, 2012

THE TRUMPETERS

A Poem by Peter Meiring, TTSS member

A Young Trumpeter Takes Flight, photo by Tammy Wolfe

 

Look towards the north to Cepheus;

Seen next to Polaris in the early Spring,

Pointing there towards the east is Cygnus,

With long neck and graceful curve of wing.

-

Deneb lights its tail, it can only be a swan.

The ancients surely knew their natural world,

When their gaze upon this constellation shone

And Cygnus the Swan it was thenceforth called.

-

In April, going north to breeding grounds,

Many swans are resting on the lake;

Their honks on taking off are thrilling sounds.

Flying in skeins and lines, their way they make.

-

A huge and lovely bird, all gleaming white,

With long and graceful neck and jet black bill

The Trumpeter Swan an unforgotten sight

And sound, the memory to thrill.

-

We appreciate recieving and being able to share Peter Miering’s inspired words. If you are inspired by Trumpeters, please share your work with us.  You can submit copy to our main office: The Trumpeter Swan Society, 12615 County Road 9, Plymouth, MN. 55441-1248.  Or send it electronically to ttss@trumpeterswansociety.org.

The photograph, of a juvenile Trumpeter in flight is by Tammy Wolfe, author and photographer.

The Trumpeter Swan Society Receives Major Grant from the Yellowstone to Yukon Consevation Initiative for Work in Montana’s Centennial Valley

May 26, 2012

Trumpeters in Centennial Valley by Jess Lee

The Trumpeter Swan Society is most grateful to the (Y2Y) Partner Grants Program for supporting our efforts to protect to swan habitat in Montana’s Centennial Valley.  Y2Y recently announced their grant of $4,500 to support our Centennial Valley Cooperative Wetland Conservation Project. The Centennial Valley, including Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, contains the single-most important nesting and molting habitat for Greater Yellowstone’s fragile Trumpeter Swan nesting flock.

Preventing damage to these habitats and where possible improving their quality is a top priority for TTSS.  Some of these wetlands also provide important habitat for Grayling, which might be listed as threatened or endangered in the near future.  Without great care, there is potential for some actions that would benefit Grayling to damage important swan habitats. In addition, at some sites water delivery problems and increasing human disturbance jeopardize swan nesting success.

Working closely with the US Fish and Wildlife Service, State of Montana, and other conservation partners, we will be working to develop a model program to minimize damage to swan habitat from fish conservation efforts and seek ways to improve swan habitat where possible. We will also be working with private landowners and public land managers to improve water levels and reduce disturbance of swans in historic habitats.

Trumpeter Pair in the Centennial Valley by Jess Lee http://www.jessleephotos.com

Remembering a Founding Father of The Trumpeter Swan Society, Peter Ward

May 4, 2012

Peter Ward at the Delta Waterfowl Research Station

Peter Ward was one of the founding fathers of The Trumpeter Swan Society in 1968.  He died suddenly on March 24 at the age of 92 in his home in Portagela Prairie, Manitoba.  Up until last May, Peter had been an integral part of the Delta Marsh for decades – “Delta Waterfowl’s ‘legend-in-residence.’”  The following is from Delta Waterfowl’s Web site:

“Peter first went to Delta Marsh in 1926 as the six-year-old son of gamekeeper Edward Ward. After serving as a bomber pilot and flight instructor with the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War II, Peter attended art school; then returned to the Delta Duck Station where he handled a variety of duties over the next 60 years. Despite having no formal training, he worked side-by-side with Albert Hochbaum, Lyle Sowls, Art Hawkins and other notable researchers on numerous ground-breaking advances in waterfowl science. Peter managed Delta’s hatchery facilities and played a key role in establishing the early breeding population and habitat surveys.”

In the late 1960s, Fred King, Chairman of the Hennepin County Park Reserve District, was keen on restoring Trumpeter Swans to Minnesota, in particular to the Park Reserve District west of Minneapolis.  Through his friendship with Ford and Charlie Bell of Minneapolis, Fred met Albert Hochbaum and Peter Ward of the Delta Waterfowl Research Station just north of Portagela Prairie.  Fred wanted Al’s and Peter’s good counsel on Trumpeters, since they had experience in raising these birds in captivity.

As Dave Weaver wrote in A History of The Trumpeter Swan Society in 2008, Fred King attributed the suggestion for a Trumpeter Swan Society to Al Hochbaum. The idea received an enthusiastic response from Fred, Peter Ward, and the other founders who had met in September 1968 to discuss the Hennepin Parks swan restoration project.

Peter Ward was always very generous with his knowledge about Trumpeters and was important in the initial efforts of Trumpeter restoration in Hennepin Parks.  When Dave Weaver spoke with him in 2008 while researching his TTSS history paper, Peter assured Dave that every Trumpeter “start up” flock had the Delta bloodline.  This was prior to using Red Rock Lakes NWR and Alaska as sources of eggs and cygnets.

With Peter hosting, the 4th Trumpeter Swan Society Conference was held in 1974 at the Delta Waterfowl Research Station, now known as Delta Waterfowl and Wetlands Research Station.  A subsequent meeting of the Society’s Board of Directors was held there a year or two later.

Peter’s obituary, written by one of his children, speaks of his love of the natural world around him, especially the marsh:  “He lived the rest of his life surrounded by the marsh, and his life’s work of paintings attest to how much he loved, understood and appreciated this life. His contributions to the world of wildlife, waterfowl, and art will not be forgotten.”

“I have no quarrel with the life I’ve led, longer and freer than most. A better person I might have been, if a roadmap for such existed.”

- An excerpt from the Memoirs of Peter Ward, unpublished.

New Video Highlights the Strong Relationship Between Trumpeter Swans and Dairy Farms in Washington State

April 29, 2012

Trumpeter Swans Feed on Field Corn at one Washington State's Dairy Farms
Photo by Art Wolfe

Writer and naturalist Jenn Dean of Washington’s Snoqualmie Valley has produced a five-minute video that will bring current issues of Trumpeter Swans wintering in western Washington to the forefront. With engaging footage of both Trumpeter Swans and dairy cows, she points to their direct relationship. Martha Jordan, former TTSS Board member and current Chair of the Washington Swan Stewards, estimates as many as 85% of Trumpeters in Washington are currently dairy dependent. They thrive on waste corn.  Jenn interviews dairy farmer Andy Werkhoven, who with his brother Jim, has been in the dairy business, farming, for thirty years.  He details the increase of sightings over the last ten years, a period in which Pacific Coast Population numbers have climbed. Washington may now host some 27,000 Trumpeters in winter, so their future is integrally tied to the future of rural land and dairy farms. While death from ingestion of lead pellets has claimed some 2300 Trumpeters over the last decade, Martha Jordan feels that loss of habitat is an equal threat to future swan populations.  Watch Jenn Dean’s video for further detail.  TTSS thanks Jenn Dean for her work in making this video to help the public understand issues that face swans, and The Trumpeter Swan Society’s role in assuring their present and future security.


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